Belize: Anthropology Field School

4 Weeks: Summer Term

Quick Info

  • Program Dates: May 31 - June 29, 2016
  • Final Application Deadline: April 15, 2016
  • Location(s): Orange Walk, Lamanai Maya Ruins, San Lazaro, Yo Creek, Belize City
  • Subject(s): Anthropology
  • Base Program Price: $3,745

May 31 - June 29, 2016

Immerse yourself in Belize as you practice field research with an experienced faculty member from Northern Kentucky University. Gain valuable skills such as ethnographic interviewing to develop an appreciation for Belizean cultural diversity.

Community-based Research Project

The ethnographic field school, as part of the CfAA, is partnering with Belizean institutes and associations in order to contribute to an understanding of household economy and agricultural knowledge of sugar cane farmers in Orange Walk District village communities. Our community partners will use our results and recommendations to develop and conduct workshops for farmers on agricultural techniques, economics, health, and other community development topics. Currently, our community partners include the: Belize Sugar Cane Farmers Association, National Institute of Culture and History, Progressive Sugar Cane Producers Association, and Sugar Industry Research and Development Institute.

Program Excursions

In addition to conducting community-based research, we plan to visit the Belize Zoo, Banquitas House of Culture, Cuello's Distillery, Lamanai Maya Ruins (via boat on the New River), Nohoch Che'en Caves Branch Archaeological Reserve (Cave Tubing), and the Tower Hill (Sugar Cane) Factory. Locations are subject to change and may be cancelled due to weather or other factors beyond our control.

Included:

  • Ground transportation between program sites
  • Accommodations in twin rooms with occasional use of multi-bedded rooms
  • All required program excursions
  • Course-related activities and entrances
  • Daily breakfast and some additional meals
  • Health and emergency evacuation insurance
  • Program directors and staff on-site 24/7

Group Travel:

Estimated Cost: $700
(estimated additional cost based on recent airline prices)

Group travel includes:

  • roundtrip air transportation from one of CCSA's designated U.S. departure cities
  • roundtrip ground transportation between airport and the accommodation site

Course Offered

Anthropology

Ethnographic Field School in Belize

3 Cr. Hrs.: Upper Division (300-400) or Graduate (500+)

This course immerses students in Belizean culture and trains them in contemporary anthropological field methods. Students will gain valuable research skills (e.g., ethnographic interviewing and qualitative data analysis) to apply anthropology in their future careers (e.g., applied anthropology or other social/behavioral discipline), an appreciation for Belizean cultural diversity, and further their personal growth. While in Belize, students will be primarily engaged in guided applied ethnographic fieldwork. Students will learn about the local culture by doing participant-observation and conducting ethnographic interviews in a community-based research project. Students will learn research ethics, unobtrusive observation, participant observation, field note writing and coding, ethnographic and life history interviewing, ethnolinguistic data collection, community mapping, rapid assessment procedures, qualitative data analysis, and other ethnographic methods in addition to basic ethnographic writing. After successful completion of this course, students will have:

  • developed a basic understanding of Belizean culture,
  • formulated an understanding of ethical and validity issues in ethnographic research,
  • practiced skills in research design and ethnographic methods of data collection,
  • applied basic ethnographic research methods in a non-western culture,
  • engaged in a community-based research project, and
  • analyzed ethnographic data resulting in an ethnographic monograph.

This program will contribute to the education of students by training them in ethnographic methods and by exposing them to a non-western culture. Students are expected to gain skills that may be used in applying anthropology or other socio-behavioral sciences in their future careers, gain an appreciation for cultural diversity, and further their personal growth. Field experiences such as this project can also improve the likelihood that students will be admitted to graduate school.

Faculty:
Dr. Douglas Hume
Northern Kentucky University
humed1@nku.edu

Academic Content PDF

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